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Make Florida Drivers Great Again

by Kerry Lutz
Financial Survival Network

The much vaunted self-driving car has a problem; it doesn’t drive very well and often suffers from poor judgment. Whether it’s a Tesla, Google Car, Mercedes or any other number of products attempting to dominate the American Highway, they just can’t seem to stay out of trouble. People have been killed or injured while proving out these technological marvels. However, there’s an easy way to speed up the research and development process, designate the entire state of Florida as a self-driving car testing site.

According to SmartAsset (a personal finance site), for the second straight year, the Florida has earned the distinction of the nation’s worst drivers. By virtually any objective measure, it stands alone, be it fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles driven, arrests for driving under the influence per 1,000 drivers, percentage of uninsured drivers and speeding tickets issued. This dreadful state of affairs is largely due to the state’s unique demographics: tourists, transplants, teens and octogenarians. Florida is overflowing with elderly drivers who’ve forgotten the basics of defensive driving or worse yet, can’t see over the steering wheel. And then there’s those pesky young people who haven’t yet learned the finer points of driving and present an imminent peril to everyone on the highway. Shockingly, Florida ranks #2 in the nation for distracted driving. I thought that in order to get distracted, you had to be paying attention in the first place, something Floridians seldom do.

With this kind of record, the State should consider becoming the epicenter of self-driving vehicle technology development. This designation will provide many benefits. Self-driving vehicles must learn every possible way in any possible circumstances for a potential accident to occur. Florida’s got that covered. Next, since the average Florida driver is so challenged and incompetent, self-driving cars can’t possibly be worse, regardless of the current state of the art. And even it they perform worse than their human counterparts, no one will notice.

Self driving cars need to be programmed to learn the worst possible case in every driving scenario. Whether it’s cutting across three lanes of traffic to hang a prohibited “u” turn to pick up a gallon of milk at the Publix, or doing triple digits on a congested interstate at rush hour, Florida offers a the ideal danger laden environment. The potential for a fatality is present at nearly every intersection. No other state comes close. While New York City is burdened with numerous iterations of the Hassan Assassin Taxi Cab Company and it’s been said that NYC cab drivers don’t drive their cars–they aim them, there just aren’t that many crashes. The reason is simple, New Yorkers are in too much of a hurry to get into an accident. The time involved in filling out the forms, making police statements and attending funerals would inevitably cause them to be late and that’s unacceptable. In easy going California, no wants to work up a sweat weaving in and out of traffic. They just want to go with the flow and who can blame them for that? You’re going to be sitting in traffic for most of the day anyway, why push it? Other states have lots of elderly people and more than their share of newby drivers, but they just can compete with Florida’s multicultural melting pot of skilless operators. When it comes to awful drivers, Florida is truly first in the nation.

Regards,
~Kerry.

2 comments to Make Florida Drivers Great Again

  • James Lovely

    Actual article says Florida is 45th in DUIs (not 1st as Kerry indicates).

    “However one factor working in Florida’s favor is the lack of DUI arrests. Florida had the 45th-lowest rates of DUIs arrests in our study.”

  • floridian

    I-95 still leads back to New York last I heard. Why not take a few of your compatriots with you?

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